Season 2, Episode 18

Many people who want to move forward say, “leave the past behind.” But according to Dr. Bruce Goldstein, that’s just not how our brains work. Dr. Goldstein is back to discuss the connection our minds make between our past and our predictions, how we form constructions, and how similar areas of the brain light up when it comes to episodic memories and future scenarios.

Guest Biography

E. Bruce Goldstein is Associate Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of Pittsburgh, and Adjunct Professor of Psychology at the University of Arizona. He has received the Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award from the University of Pittsburgh for his classroom teaching and textbook writing. He received his bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering from Tufts University and his PhD in Experimental Psychology from Brown University. He was a postdoctoral fellow in the Biology Department at Harvard University before joining the faculty at the University of Pittsburgh. Bruce has published papers on a wide variety of topics, including retinal and cortical physiology, visual attention and the perception of pictures. He is the author of Sensation and Perception, 10th edition (Cengage, 2017), Cognitive Psychology: Connecting Mind, Research, and Everyday Experience, 5th Edition (Cengage, 2018), and the editor of the Blackwell Handbook of Perception (Blackwell, 2001) and the two-volume Sage Encyclopedia of Perception (Sage, 2010).

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April 20, 2018

The Predictive Mind

Season 2, Episode 17

According to Professor E. Bruce Goldstein, perception is easy to learn. But by itself, it’s more complicated than one might think—especially for our retinas. Join Professor Goldstein, writer on topics such as retinal and cortical physiology, as he reveals how our eyes process images based on our memory, perception, decision-making and more.

 

Guest Biography

E. Bruce Goldstein is Associate Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of Pittsburgh, and Adjunct Professor of Psychology at the University of Arizona. He has received the Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award from the University of Pittsburgh for his classroom teaching and textbook writing. He received his bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering from Tufts University and his PhD in Experimental Psychology from Brown University. He was a postdoctoral fellow in the Biology Department at Harvard University before joining the faculty at the University of Pittsburgh. Bruce has published papers on a wide variety of topics, including retinal and cortical physiology, visual attention and the perception of pictures. He is the author of Sensation and Perception, 10th edition (Cengage, 2017), Cognitive Psychology: Connecting Mind, Research, and Everyday Experience, 5th Edition (Cengage, 2018), and the editor of the Blackwell Handbook of Perception (Blackwell, 2001) and the two-volume Sage Encyclopedia of Perception (Sage, 2010).

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Season 2, Episode 16

When your child displays severe behavioral issues, pinpointing the right treatment can offer profound relief for the whole family. Dr. V. Mark Durand is back to discuss certain behaviors that individuals on the autism spectrum can present. Explore treatments as well as strategies for parents affected by these unique challenges, and discover how Dr. Durand became the expert in his field that he is today.

 

Guest Biography

Dr. V. Mark Durand is a Professor of Psychology at the University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, and the author of more than a dozen books including two textbooks on Abnormal Psychology. The main focus of Psychology—discovering why people behave the way they do—continues to inspire him.

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Season 2, Episode 15

With the public discussion around Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), it’s critically important to discuss misconceptions and form an accurate understanding— Join us and Dr. V. Mark Durand—Professor of Psychology at the University of South Florida, St. Petersburg and the current President Elect Designate of the APA Division 33—to get an overview of ASD, its causes, treatments and more.

 

Guest Biography

Dr. V. Mark Durand is a Professor of Psychology at the University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, and the author of more than a dozen books including two textbooks on Abnormal Psychology. The main focus of Psychology—discovering why people behave the way they do—continues to inspire him.

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Season 2, Episode 14

Leave it to Cognitive Psychologists to get us inspired by how our brains process what we see. That’s what Dr. Mike Hout does when he reveals how the most interesting parts of vision happen behind the scenes—in other words, how we interpret motion, color and shape. Learn more about the research Dr. Hout conducts in his lab at New Mexico State University, and his take on using technology to help people control computers through—you guessed it—eye movement.

 

Guest Biography

Anthony Barnhart is an Assistant Professor of Psychological Science at Carthage College in Kenosha, Wisconsin.  He received his Ph.D. in Cognitive Science from Arizona State University, where he began his graduate career with the intention of being a language researcher. To this end, he has published research examining the processes underlying handwritten word perception, a domain that has been largely ignored by psychologists. However, Tony is also a part-time professional magician with over 20 years of performing experience. His research trajectory changed in 2010 with the publication of the book Sleights of Mind: What the Neuroscience of Magic Reveals about our Everyday Deceptions, in which he was featured as a consultant and teacher on the science of stage magic. The scientific interest that the book garnered motivated Tony to shift his focus toward the interface of science and magic. His current research on the topic explores inattentional blindness and the techniques magicians use to manipulate attentional deployment in time. He regularly teaches a college course devoted to the cognitive science of magic. More information is available at www.AnthonyBarnhart.com.

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Season 2, Episode 13

Newly minted Psychology students are often swept up by the glamour of “lit up” brains in neuroscience, or the ubiquitous notion of clinical/counseling Psychology, according to Dr. Mike Hout of New Mexico State University. But as undergrads, a whole middle ground of studies could be right under their noses. Here, Dr. Hout explains how he got into Cognitive Psychology, and how to get students to appreciate and understand cognition in your course.

 

Guest Biography

Dr Hout is an assistant professor at New Mexico State University. His research is focused primarily on understanding human memory and attention, with an emphasis on human visual processing and eye movements. However, he also works in other areas, attempting to understand how the mind accomplishes such tasks as categorization, understanding speech and being able to appreciate similarity. He publishes regularly in peer-review outlets like the Journal of Experimental Psychology, as well as popular science outlets, like Scientific American Mind magazine. He recently collaborated on a grant that is being funded by the National Institutes of Health, he is an associate editor at Attention, Perception, & Pscyhophysics. His research and teaching have won him three awards from NMSU, including the Donald C. Roush Award for Teaching Excellence and the Early Career Award for Exceptional Achievements in Creative Scholarly Activity. His love of Psychology was started, comically enough, when his mother bought him a Sigmund Freud book as a teenager. From there, he began reading the works of Oliver Sacks, which made him curious about the brain, and fell in love with Cognitive Psychology during an undergraduate course at the University of Pittsburgh. He reports that he couldn't imagine studying or teaching anything else.

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Season 2, Episode 12

Those who say magic has no place in science have never met Professor Tony Barnhart. In our previous sit-down with Dr. Barnhart, he pulled teaching strategies out of his hat—including why his colleagues in Cognitive Psychology are drawn to magic, not just for its entertainment value, but because it can also be used in the classroom. In Part Two of our sit-down, Dr. Barnhart discusses skepticism and critical thinking as well as his grand finale: a magic trick you can use to enable scientific analysis in your course. 

Guest Biography

Anthony Barnhart is an Assistant Professor of Psychological Science at Carthage College in Kenosha, Wisconsin.  He received his Ph.D. in Cognitive Science from Arizona State University, where he began his graduate career with the intention of being a language researcher. To this end, he has published research examining the processes underlying handwritten word perception, a domain that has been largely ignored by psychologists. However, Tony is also a part-time professional magician with over 20 years of performing experience. His research trajectory changed in 2010 with the publication of the book Sleights of Mind: What the Neuroscience of Magic Reveals about our Everyday Deceptions, in which he was featured as a consultant and teacher on the science of stage magic. The scientific interest that the book garnered motivated Tony to shift his focus toward the interface of science and magic. His current research on the topic explores inattentional blindness and the techniques magicians use to manipulate attentional deployment in time. He regularly teaches a college course devoted to the cognitive science of magic. More information is available at www.AnthonyBarnhart.com.

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Season 2, Episode 11

Children who learn simple magic tricks probably don’t expect to relearn them in college. That was certainly the case for Dr. Anthony Barnhart, who became a budding illusionist at age seven. Sure enough, Dr. Barnhart now works with fellow magic-loving Psychologists at Barrow Neurological Institute. He’s written books, performed acts and given talks in the name of Neuroscience—all with a sleight of hand. Hear more of Dr. Barnhart’s story, and how he puts theories of magic to the scientific test at Carthage College.

 

Guest Biography

Anthony Barnhart is an Assistant Professor of Psychological Science at Carthage College in Kenosha, Wisconsin.  He received his Ph.D. in Cognitive Science from Arizona State University, where he began his graduate career with the intention of being a language researcher. To this end, he has published research examining the processes underlying handwritten word perception, a domain that has been largely ignored by psychologists. However, Tony is also a part-time professional magician with over 20 years of performing experience. His research trajectory changed in 2010 with the publication of the book Sleights of Mind: What the Neuroscience of Magic Reveals about our Everyday Deceptions, in which he was featured as a consultant and teacher on the science of stage magic. The scientific interest that the book garnered motivated Tony to shift his focus toward the interface of science and magic. His current research on the topic explores inattentional blindness and the techniques magicians use to manipulate attentional deployment in time. He regularly teaches a college course devoted to the cognitive science of magic. More information is available at www.AnthonyBarnhart.com.

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Season 2, Episode 10

How do you lecture students when you no longer consider yourself a lecturer? If you’re Dr. Eric Landrum, Ph.D., you record them for students to watch outside of class. He says this flipped approach enriches the “instructional experience,” where students value collaborating together on Psychology projects during class—as opposed to procrastinating on traditionally assigned homework until the night before it’s due. Join Dr. Landrum as he discusses the flipped-classroom approach for his skills-based Psychology lessons—and what to do if you’re timid about trying it yourself.

 

Guest Biography

R. Eric Landrum is a professor of psychology at Boise State University, receiving his PhD in cognitive psychology from Southern Illinois University-Carbondale. His research interests center on the educational conditions that best facilitate student success as well as the use of SoTL strategies to advance the efforts of scientist-educators.  He has over 400 professional presentations at conferences and published over 25 books/book chapters, and has published over 75 professional articles in scholarly, peer-reviewed journals. He has worked with over 300 undergraduate research assistants and taught over 13,000 students in 24 years at Boise State.  During Summer 2008, he led an American Psychological Association (APA) working group at the National Conference for Undergraduate Education in Psychology studying the desired results of an undergraduate psychology education.  During the October 2014 Educational Leadership Conference in Washington, DC, Eric was presented with a Presidential Citation from then APA President Nadine Kaslow for his outstanding contributions to the teaching of psychology. 

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Season 2, Episode 9

Read. Regurgitate. Repeat. Dr. R. Eric Landrum, Ph.D., says students are often prepared for multiple choice exams, but not opportunities to think critically. But Dr. Landrum had an “aha” moment: students could either memorize 800 pages of an Intro to Psych textbook, or take five themes from said book to effect meaningful life changes. No matter how well that book was written, Dr. Landrum says only one of these models can set up students for long-term practical skills. Listen to Dr. Landrum’s model for a 22nd Century Higher Education, and ways to put as much focus on practical skill development as you would knowledge acquisition. 

 

Guest Biography

R. Eric Landrum is a professor of psychology at Boise State University, receiving his PhD in cognitive psychology from Southern Illinois University-Carbondale. His research interests center on the educational conditions that best facilitate student success as well as the use of SoTL strategies to advance the efforts of scientist-educators.  He has over 400 professional presentations at conferences and published over 25 books/book chapters, and has published over 75 professional articles in scholarly, peer-reviewed journals. He has worked with over 300 undergraduate research assistants and taught over 13,000 students in 24 years at Boise State.  During Summer 2008, he led an American Psychological Association (APA) working group at the National Conference for Undergraduate Education in Psychology studying the desired results of an undergraduate psychology education.  During the October 2014 Educational Leadership Conference in Washington, DC, Eric was presented with a Presidential Citation from then APA President Nadine Kaslow for his outstanding contributions to the teaching of psychology. 

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