Why Should I Use Humor in the Classroom?

November 2, 2017

Season 2 Episode 5

Who says humor doesn’t belong in the classroom? Not Professor Benjamin White, whose comic chops turn ordinary Psychology lessons into a study of the human wit. While White emphasizes he doesn’t moonlight as a comedian, he actively plays for laughs throughout his courses and says it benefits his students. Join White as he discusses the psychology and neuroscience of humor—a talk so engaging, you won’t be heckling! 

 

Guest Biography

Benjamin White is a Professor of Psychology at Blinn College in Bryan, TX, where he teaches General Psychology, Social Psychology and the Psychology of Adjustment. He is also the Faculty Fellow for the Center for Teaching and Learning at Blinn College, and delivers professional development talks and workshops on various aspects of andragogy, teaching, presentation strategies and learning to faculty several times a semester. Prior to teaching, Benjamin has worked as a Researcher and Lab Manager at Texas A&M University, Brandeis University and Harvard University, where he has done research on several topics in social neuroscience and visual learning.

He has a special interest in developing better student experiences and works across disciplines to develop strategies for increasing student engagement. Benjamin also serves Blinn College as the Curriculum Resource Team Chair for the Department of Psychology and serves on the Strategic Planning committees for both the institution and division of social sciences.

 

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Confession of a Serial Killer

October 18, 2017

Season 2 Episode 3

Our obsession with crime shows reveals a strong public interest in disturbing murderous acts. Professor of Forensic Psychology Dr. Katherine Ramsland doesn’t just watch these shows, she lives them. In fact, she has someone she’d like to introduce you to—and 10 people she can’t. Listen to Dr. Ramsland’s harrowing account of her face-to-face interviews with convicted serial killer Dennis Rader as she dissects the mindset and motives that led to 10 innocent lives gruesomely cut short. Lock your doors, keep your lights on and tune in to the new Neuro.

 

Guest Biography

Dr. Katherine Ramsland, Ph.D., began her career as an undergraduate with a double major in Psychology and Philosophy. She then went into a master's program at Duquesne University that combined them, but moved on to a Ph.D. in Philosophy. Having spent time as a Therapist and an Experimental Psychology Lab Assistant, she ultimately decided to pursue another Master’s Degree at John Jay College of Criminal Justice—this time in Forensic Psychology, which changed her life. Now, she’s a Professor of Forensic Psychology at DeSales University and the author of 60 books. Dr. Ramsland loves exploring the developmental trajectory of people who become criminal offenders—especially serial killers—as well the fine details of individual casework. These have been her passion for more than two decades, and she tries to pass along this interest to her students.

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Seizing Your Aha! Moments

October 4, 2017

Season 2 Episode 4

You know those moments: when you spark up a new idea, and you can just imagine the cartoon lightbulb flashing above your head. Well, according to brain research by Dr. Katherine Ramsland, an actual spark occurs in the right temporal lobe when you’re feeling rather brilliant. More than a matter of shifting your thoughts, these “snaps” have a three-step process—and Dr. Ramsland wants you to take control of them. Here, Professor Jeffrey Armstrong returns for part two of his conversation with Dr. Ramsland. Learn what’s making you snap—in a good way—and how to make it happen more often. 

 

Guest Biography

Dr. Katherine Ramsland, Ph.D., began her career as an undergraduate with a double major in Psychology and Philosophy. She then went into a master's program at Duquesne University that combined them, but moved on to a Ph.D. in Philosophy. Having spent time as a Therapist and an Experimental Psychology Lab Assistant, she ultimately decided to pursue another Master’s Degree at John Jay College of Criminal Justice—this time in Forensic Psychology, which changed her life. Now, she’s a Professor of Forensic Psychology at DeSales University and the author of 60 books. Dr. Ramsland loves exploring the developmental trajectory of people who become criminal offenders—especially serial killers—as well the fine details of individual casework. These have been her passion for more than two decades, and she tries to pass along this interest to her students.

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Heighten Your Senses

September 20, 2017

Season 2 Episode 2

Whether we are eating at noisy, crowded restaurants or going to eardrum-damaging concerts, there's a psychological explanation for our odd preferences: habituation and sensitization. In this podcast, we’ll discuss the universal principle of habituation, and how high intensity stimulation provides recovery from it—in other words, sensitization. Tune in—without damaging your eardrums—to hear more on Season 2, Episode 2 of The Neuro Transmission! 

 

Guest Biography:

Professor of Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin, has taught learning to undergraduate and graduate students since 1973. He served as Department Chair from 1999–2005 and was the Founding Director of the Imaging Research Center from 2005–2008. Noted for his functional approach to classical conditioning, Professor Domjan has pursued studies of sexual conditioning and taste aversion learning. Domjan is the 2014 recipient of the D. O. Hebb Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award from Division 6 of the American Psychological Association. His research, supported by grants from NSF and NIH for 30 years, was previously selected for a MERIT Award by the National Institutes of Mental Health and a Golden Fleece Award by United States Senator William Proxmire.

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Force of Habit

September 6, 2017

Season 2 Episode 1

Those 3rd, 4th and 5th slices of pizza just aren’t as glorious as the very first bite. Why? Because there's a psychological explanation for our odd preferences: habituation. In this podcast episode, we’ll discuss the universal principle of habituation. “It’s a force of habit” will take on a whole new meaning, and you’ll want to get in the habit of tuning into The Neuro Transmission!

 

Guest Biography:

Professor of Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin, has taught learning to undergraduate and graduate students since 1973. He served as Department Chair from 1999–2005 and was the Founding Director of the Imaging Research Center from 2005–2008. Noted for his functional approach to classical conditioning, Professor Domjan has pursued studies of sexual conditioning and taste aversion learning. Domjan is the 2014 recipient of the D. O. Hebb Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award from Division 6 of the American Psychological Association. His research, supported by grants from NSF and NIH for 30 years, was previously selected for a MERIT Award by the National Institutes of Mental Health and a Golden Fleece Award by United States Senator William Proxmire.

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Epigenetics in Intro Psych with Dr. Laura Freberg

August 5, 2016

Episode 5, Part 2

Why should we teach Epigenetics in Intro Psych? Many Intro Psych faculty feel like teaching epigenetics takes them outside of their comfort zone, but this podcast not only makes a case for why we need to teach it but also how someone unfamiliar with genetics can come up to speed quickly. Epigenetics helps us explain why psychologists no longer say nature VERSUS nurture, but rather talk about nature and nurture as constantly interacting. Engaging examples of epigenetics, such as the effects of the plastic additive BPA, can help make this topic resonate with students.

Guest Biography: Laura A. Freberg (Ph.D., UCLA) is Professor of Psychology at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, Read the rest of this entry »

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The Psychology of Love with Dr. Laura Freberg

July 28, 2016

Episode 5, Part 1

What is love? This question is usually asked by poets, playwrights, and other artists, but today’s neuroscientists have a lot to say about the matter, too. This podcast looks at how the brain distinguishes between liking, love, and sexual desire, and why we are attracted to “that special someone” out of the billions of people on the planet. Once a relationship happens, though, it’s just as important to see what psychological sciences says about what makes it keep going. What factors distinguish between happy couples and couples unlikely to stay together? In this podcast, Laura Freberg discusses the psychological and biological aspects of falling in love, and sheds some light on what’s really going on when we meet someone and say “wow!”

Guest Biography: Laura A. Freberg (Ph.D., UCLA) is Professor of Psychology at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo,  Read the rest of this entry »

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Happiness: What Makes You Happy? with Dr. Jeff Nevid

July 22, 2016

Episode 4, Part 2

Do you want to be happy? Of course you do. But what makes people happy? Is it wealth?   Health? Marriage? Purpose in life? All of the above? Psychology was slow to the party when it came to studying what makes people happy. It wasn’t until the 1990s with the emergence of a new movement in psychology, called positive psychology, that serious research attention was focused on understanding the factors contributing to human happiness and well-being. Positive psychology was a dramatic shift within psychology from focusing on understanding human deficits or problems, like drug abuse and psychological disorders, to exploring human virtues and assets, such as helping behavior, love, and happiness. What these researchers discovered about happiness may surprise you. Tune in to find out more!

Guest BiographyDr. Jeffrey Nevid is Professor of Psychology at St. John's University in New York. He received his doctorate from  Read the rest of this entry »

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Ace that Test: Study Tips for Getting the Most from this Course (and Your Other Courses) with Dr. Jeff Nevid

July 14, 2016

Episode 4, Part 1

Students often say that they spend many hours reading their textbooks and attending classes, but their grades don’t reflect the work that they do. Success is not simply a function of the time you put into your courses, but how well you use that time. Developing more effective study skills can help you become a more effective learner and get the most from your courses. In this podcast, psychologist Jeff Nevid shows how effective learning is a skill you can acquire that will help you ace that test.

Guest Biography: Dr. Jeffrey Nevid is Professor of Psychology at St. John's University in New York. He received his doctorate from  Read the rest of this entry »

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The Benefits of an E-Portfolio in Psychology with Dr. Tanya Martini

July 8, 2016

Episode 3, Part 2

E-portfolios have become popular in recent years. Tune in to learn about e-portfolio assignments and their benefits and challenges for both professors and students.

Guest Biography: Tanya Martini obtained her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from the University of Toronto and is a Professor  Read the rest of this entry »

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